Wealth Management

Wealth Management

​Selby Jennings: Wealth Management Recruitment

Despite political instability and the Brexit decision, the United Kingdom maintains its position as the world’s second-largest wealth management centre in terms of AMA (assets under management and administration). The market is dominated by the private banking divisions of universal banks, as well as independent wealth managers and online stockbrokers offering execution, custody, and research services through online portals.

Wealth managers have a position of immense privilege. As trusted advisors, they help exceptional people navigate the complexities of today’s financial world. Wealth managers offer more than just investment advice but a holistic approach to enable high net worth individuals to manage their money and anticipate their own or their family’s needs. The demand for wealth managers continues to grow – by 2023, there are expected to be 7.7 million more high-net-worth-individuals (HNWIs) in the world, according to Wealth-X.

At Selby Jennings, the wealth management team consists of experienced recruitment consultants who have an expert understanding of specific geography. This structure enables our specialist consultants to identify, qualify, and introduce the highest level calibre wealth management professionals in the marketplace. With the continued internationalisation of wealth management, our clients expect to acquire not only the best candidates within their jurisdiction but the best globally and our set-up makes this achievable. Working as a team we are able to combine each consultant’s local knowledge and offer access to a global talent pool. The team have successfully helped a broad range of clients including: global private banks; boutique private banks; single and multi-family offices; and independent wealth management companies.

​If you're a corporate & investment banking professional, please register your resume.

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Benefits of working with Selby Jennings’ global private wealth management team

We are a specialist talent partner. Among the many benefits of working with Selby Jennings’ global wealth management team are:

Experience

We have nearly 20 years of experience as a leading talent partner in Financial Sciences & Services.​

Network

A vast, global network of the best, in-demand professionals, working with the world’s largest financial institutions to innovative fintech start-ups and beyond.

Knowledge

Our award-winning talent specialists offer bespoke, tailored guidance on the latest hiring trends and industry news to help you achieve your goals.

Do not miss out on securing your desired wealth management professionals or securing your next wealth management role.

Wealth Management Jobs

New Business Manager

Key job scope will include: Drive client acquisition and activation by acquiring new clients. Strengthen ties with strategic referral partners to enhance recognition of wealth management & life insurance planning. Forge new referral alliances leveraging personal networks. Track market trends and prepare comprehensive development reports. Foster strong relationships with internal teams and referral associates. Formalize banker connections where necessary. Showcase Howden Private Wealth's expertise through thought leadership. Ensure strict adherence to regulatory standards and company policies. Conduct training sessions to emphasize the importance of wealth management and life insurance planning. Collaborate with partners to pinpoint client opportunities for wealth management services. Coordinate introducer and client marketing events. Provide support in business administration tasks, including documentation and meeting arrangements.

Negotiable
Malaysia
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Global Multi Family Office RM

Global Multi Family Office Opportunity in Shanghai! A notable multi family office is seeking an exceptional candidate for the position of Relationship Manager. Established in Singapore in 2020 and having the fund management license issued by Monetary Authority Of Singapore (MAS), the company is committed to providing Asian entrepreneurs and ultra-high-net-worth clients with one-stop offshore financial services. At present, the Company has offices in Shanghai and Singapore and its business covers investment bank, external asset management, family office, private equity investment and family trust, etc. The ideal candidate will be responsible for farming high net worth individuals and ultra-high net worth clients by providing top-notch wealth management services. Responsibilities & Requirements Build strong business relationships with HNW (High Net Worth) and UHNW (Ultra-High Net Worth) individuals, understand their needs, and develop customized wealth management solutions. Excellent communication skills capable of presenting ideas persuasively both orally and in written form A Bachelor's degree or higher qualification, fluent in both Mandarin and English At least 5 years experience working within the wealth management industry Prior working experience in offshore asset management targeting HNW/UHNW

Negotiable
Shanghai
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Senior Business Management Manager - European Private Bank

My client is one of the top Private Bank with footprint across the global. To support their expansion, the are now adding a new headcount to their Business Management team. Duties: Support the strategy design and execution for the Asia private bank Conduct feasibility study regarding the expansion strategy on Asia and China onshore business Lead a team of RMs to handle their daily issue and implement scorecard for the team Maintain strong relationship with both internal and external stakeholders Lead change initiatives in coordination with front to back office while ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements Requirements: 12+ years of working experience in private banking sector, especially in front office Sound knowledge in private banking business and products Familiar with Hong Kong and European regulatory polices Strong presentation and communication skills Excellent language proficiency

HK$1000000 - HK$1500000 per annum
Hong Kong
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Financial Advisor

Responsibilities: - Build and maintain relationships with high-net-worth clients, serving as their trusted advisor and primary point of contact for all financial matters. - Conduct in-depth financial analysis and develop personalized financial plans tailored to each client's unique goals, risk tolerance, and time horizon. - Provide guidance and recommendations on a wide range of financial products and services, including investments, retirement planning, estate planning, insurance, and tax strategies. - Execute trades and manage client portfolios in accordance with established investment policies and objectives, ensuring alignment with client's goals and risk profiles. - Monitor and review client portfolios regularly, making adjustments as needed to optimize performance and adapt to changing market conditions. - Stay informed about industry trends, regulatory changes, and new investment products, and proactively communicate relevant information to clients. Requirements: - Bachelor's degree in Finance, Business Administration, Economics, or a related field. - Series 7 and Series 66 (or Series 63 and Series 65) licenses required. - Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designation preferred. - Minimum of 3-5 years of experience as a Financial Advisor - Proven track record of success in building and managing client relationships, achieving sales targets, and delivering exceptional service. - Strong knowledge of financial planning principles, investment products, and industry regulations. - Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, with the ability to explain complex financial concepts in a clear and concise manner. - Ability to work independently and collaboratively within a team environment, demonstrating professionalism, integrity, and a commitment to client satisfaction.

US$200000 - US$500000 per year + comp based on revenue production
Manhattan
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Senior Private Banker - London

Company Overview: Our client is a prestigious international private bank with a strong presence in the UK market. With offices spanning the globe, they are currently focused on expanding their London branch. They are actively seeking seasoned Private Bankers with an established network of HNW or UHNW clients who would benefit from their global platform and booking centres, their extensive lending capabilities and strong reputation. Role Overview: As a Senior Relationship Manager, your key role will be to broaden our client network and nurture existing relationships. You will seek and onboard new clients while providing financial advice to both existing and new clients based on their financial needs. You will keep a close watch on financial markets and stay updated with international wealth management trends. Responsibilities: Client Acquisition: Identify and onboard new clients, including individuals of high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth. Business development: Keep abreast of financial markets, investment trends, and regulatory changes pertinent to wealth management to identify new business opportunity. Portfolio Management: Oversee investment portfolios, ensuring alignment with clients' objectives, monitor market trends, adapt investment strategies as necessary, and carry out trades across a variety of asset classes. Compliance: Ensure adherence to all regulatory standards, compile essential paperwork for client consultations, account initiation, and evaluations, and execute Know Your Customer (KYC) procedures Market Monitoring: Maintain up-to-date knowledge on financial markets, trends in investment, and alterations in regulations pertinent to wealth management. Qualification: Minimum 5 years of experience as a Relationship Manager or Senior Relationship Manager. Strong knowledge of the financial markets, products, and services. Proven track record in managing HNW/UHNW clients. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Fluent in English Why Join Us? Be part of a vibrant team in a well-established private bank. Exposure to a varied clientele and seize thrilling opportunities for growth. Competitive remuneration and benefits package. If you are an experienced Relationship Manager with a dedication to catering to HNW and UHNW clients, we are eager to connect with you!

Negotiable
England
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Senior Relationship Manager - APAC Market

Senior Relationship Manager - APAC Market Location: Zurich, Switzerland About Company: Our client is a prestigious private bank with a strong presence in the APAC market. Our APAC team is one of the most developed and successful in the country. We pride ourselves on providing exceptional financial services to our high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth clients. Role Overview: As a Senior Relationship Manager, you will play a crucial role in expanding our client base and managing existing relationships. Your primary focus will be on the APAC market, where you'll prospect and acquire new clients while advising both existing and new clients on their financial needs. You'll closely monitor financial markets and stay abreast of trends in international wealth management. Responsibilities: Prospecting and Acquisition: Identify and acquire new clients from the APAC market, including high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth individuals. Client Advisory: Provide comprehensive financial advice to existing and new clients, addressing their unique needs and goals. Market Monitoring: Stay informed about financial markets, investment trends, and regulatory changes relevant to wealth management. Portfolio Management: Manage and own a portfolio of private clients, ensuring their financial objectives are met. Compliance: Maintain a strong understanding of global compliance aspects related to wealth management. Collaboration: Work closely with internal teams to deliver exceptional service and solutions to clients. Qualifications: Minimum 5 years of experience in a similar position covering the APAC region. Successful track record in advising and looking after private clients in the APAC market. Very good knowledge of financial products, services, and compliance requirements. Why Join Us? Be part of a dynamic team in a well-established private bank. Access to a diverse client base and exciting growth opportunities. Competitive compensation and benefits package. If you're a seasoned Relationship Manager with a passion for serving clients in the APAC market, we'd love to hear from you!

Negotiable
Zurich
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Assistant Relationship Manager

Assistant Relationship Manager - Zurich Company: Our client is an Independent Wealth Manager with several offices in Switzerland. Role Overview: They are searching for an Assistant Relationship Manager for their Zurich Office. In this role, you will support one or more Relationship Managers (RMs) in the operational management of their client books. Your role is crucial in maintaining quality relationships with clients and contributing to the bank's positive image. Responsibilities: Client Liaison: Ensure effective communication between clients, RMs, Service Team, and operational departments. Daily Operations: Assist RMs in executing day-to-day business activities and occasional tasks. Client Account Management: Handle account openings/closings, order entries, and cash management. Compliance: Control client identification, call-backs, and adherence to regulations. Business Trips: Prepare and coordinate RM's business trips. Bank Procedures: Work within established practices and procedures. Qualifications: Education: Federal VET Diploma (EFZ) or University degree. Experience: 2-5 years in a similar function. Regulatory Knowledge: Very good understanding of regulations in the field of Wealth Management. Personal Skills: Service-oriented, dedicated to client needs, organised, excellent team spirit, rigorous, and discreet. If you are passionate about wealth management, client relationships, and operational excellence, we encourage you to apply for this exciting opportunity!

Negotiable
Zurich
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Portofolio Managers

Job Title: Portfolio Manager Company Overview: Our client is a leading financial services company based in Zurich, Switzerland. Our team is dedicated to managing investment portfolios for our clients, ensuring optimal returns and risk management. Responsibilities: Develop and implement investment strategies for client portfolios. Conduct thorough research and analysis of financial markets, asset classes, and individual securities. Monitor portfolio performance and adjust allocations as needed. Collaborate with other departments, including risk management and compliance. Provide investment advice to clients and maintain strong client relationships. Stay informed about market trends, economic developments, and regulatory changes. Qualifications: Bachelor's or Master's degree in finance, economics, or a related field. At least 5 years of experience in portfolio management. Strong analytic skills and proficiency in financial modeling. Excellent communication and presentation abilities. CFA or other relevant certifications preferred. Benefits: Competitive salary and performance-based bonuses. Comprehensive health and retirement benefits. Professional development opportunities. Dynamic and collaborative work environment.

Negotiable
Zurich
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Swiss-Onshore Relationship Manager - Geneva

Job Title: Senior Relationship Manager - Swiss Onshore Market Company Overview: Our client is a well-established Multi Family Office based in Geneva, Switzerland. They specialize in providing comprehensive wealth management services to high-net-worth individuals (HNWIs) and ultra-high-net-worth individuals (UHNWIs). As part of their growth strategy, they are seeking an experienced Senior Relationship Manager to join their wealth management department. Job Description: As a Senior Relationship Manager, you will play a crucial role in managing and growing the client portfolio within the Swiss-Onshore market. Here are the key responsibilities: Client Relationship Management: Develop and maintain strong relationships with existing clients. Understand their financial needs, goals, and risk tolerance. Provide personalised advice and solutions tailored to individual clients. Business Development: Identify new business opportunities within the Swiss-Onshore market. Proactively engage with prospects and convert them into clients. Collaborate with the investment advisory and portfolio management teams to deliver comprehensive solutions. Portfolio Management: Oversee investment portfolios, ensuring alignment with clients' objectives. Monitor market trends and adjust investment strategies as needed. Execute trades across various asset classes. Compliance and Documentation: Ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. Prepare necessary documentation for client meetings, account openings, and reviews. Conduct KYC (Know Your Customer) processes. Qualifications: Minimum 5 years of experience as a Relationship Manager or Senior Relationship Manager. Strong knowledge of Swiss financial markets, products, and services. Proven track record in managing HNWI/UHNWI clients. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Fluent in English; additional languages (such as French or German) are a plus.

Negotiable
Geneva
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Relationship Manager

Responsibilities: Client Relationship Management: Cultivate and maintain strong relationships with high-net-worth individuals (HNWI) and ultra-high-net-worth individuals (UHNWI). Identify new business opportunities through referrals and networking. Understand clients' financial objectives, risk tolerance, and investment preferences. Investment Advisory: Provide personalised investment advice, including asset allocation, portfolio construction, and risk management. Collaborate with our in-house research team to stay informed about market trends and investment opportunities. Wealth Planning: Work closely with clients to create comprehensive wealth management plans. Address estate planning, tax optimisation, and succession planning. Client Reporting: Prepare regular performance reports and updates for clients. Ensure transparency and clear communication regarding portfolio performance. Qualifications: Minimum 4 years of experience as a Private Banker, within a family office or private banking environment. Proven track record of managing high-net-worth portfolios. Strong analytical skills and a deep understanding of financial markets. Fluency in English; additional languages (such as French or German) are advantageous.

Negotiable
Zurich
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Senior Relationship Manager - Swiss Market

Job Title: Senior Relationship Manager - Swiss Markets Company Overview: Our client is a renowned Swiss private bank with a strong presence in the Swiss markets. They are seeking an experienced Senior Relationship Manager to join their team in Zurich. Job Description: As a Senior Relationship Manager, you will be responsible for the following: Prospecting and Acquiring Clients: Identify and acquire new clients and assets from the U/HNWI private client segment in the Swiss markets. Build and maintain strong relationships with existing clients. Financial Advisory: Advise clients on all aspects of their financial needs, including investment strategies, wealth management, and financial planning. Market Monitoring: Stay informed about financial markets and trends in international wealth management. Adapt strategies based on market conditions. Business Planning: Define and execute a business plan tailored to the team's clientele and network of relations. Expected Profile: Currently working in a private bank, EAM (External Asset Manager), multi-family office, or financial institute. Minimum 7 years of experience in a similar position. Managing and owning a portfolio of private clients. Successful track record in advising and looking after private clients in the Swiss markets. Strong knowledge of financial products, services, global compliance, and financial markets. Teams specialized in specific markets are welcomed.

Negotiable
Zurich
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Securities Private Banking Manager

Job responsibilities: Develop and implement a business plan for the private wealth team based on the overall development strategy of the company and department; Responsible for the business operations of the private wealth team, leading the team to achieve the operational targets set by the company; Lead the team to expand business, develop channels, improve organizational performance, promote the company's brand, and enhance the competitiveness of the private wealth team in the region and industry; Responsible for cultivating and guiding private wealth advisors and other members; Being able to complete team building, enhance team cohesion, and drive team development; Strictly abide by compliance regulations, and prevent and resolve business risks. Qualification: Bachelor's degree or above; Strong interest in the financial industry and wealth management business; Priority is given to work experience in retail/personal business in the financial industry; Possess certain knowledge of financial products and strong learning ability; Focusing on customers, passionate about sales and the financial industry, proactive and confident, with excellent communication and interpersonal skills; Possess fund qualification certificate and securities qualification certificate (could take the examination after onboarding) Priority will be given to those who have a deep understanding of the socio-economic situation in their region. Bonus points: Relevant experience in banking, securities/futures

Negotiable
Shanghai
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Wealth Management New & Insights

2023 Bonus Season Breakdown Image
insurance-and-actuarial

2023 Bonus Season Breakdown

Discover the latest analysis of bonuses and rewards in the Financial Sciences & Services industry, and how it impacts the talent market.Understanding bonus structure has become not only a critical aspect to businesses in attracting and retaining top talent, but also for professionals in knowing their true value.Analysing the rewards arrangement across the Finance and Banking industry, we surveyed over 2,000 professionals based in Europe to discover:What value their bonuses are Whether they are satisfied with their bonusKey drivers behind their bonus pay-outsPerformance metrics used to determine bonuses Offering valuable insights to both professionals looking to benchmark themselves, and for businesses reflecting on their compensation strategies, both parties can take away a number of key considerations from this exclusive report. ​Download your copy of the 'Bonus Season Breakdown' report by completing the form below:​

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private-wealth-management

How to Make the Perfect Job Offer

​Finding the perfect candidate for your latest role can be a long and arduous road. Once you have found the employee with the skills you need and an attitude which will fit perfectly within your team, it is time to make your job offer. In a perfect world, you will get an enthusiastic acceptance. However, if you are hiring in a busy sector, or trying it, is likely you may have to negotiate salary and other benefits before you can seal the deal.Competition for talent is fierce. The pressure is on for hiring managers to secure the right candidate by offering an attractive compensation package before they accept an offer from a competitor. The aim of a salary negotiation is not to find a compromise where both parties are dissatisfied but find a balance where you both come out feeling valued, and enthusiastic about moving forward. Negotiating salary can be a tricky business that requires a high level of strategy.​Set your limits before you advertise the jobSalary negotiations can be complicated - planning will give you an obvious advantage. Before you even start interviewing your candidates, you need to choose the right salary to advertise, including the upper limit to where you are willing to negotiate for an exceptional candidate.Your lowest salary offer should still be in line with industry standards, with your upper limit reserved for excellent candidates who will offer extra value to the role. Don’t include your upper salary limit in any of your job advertising or recruitment efforts. There are several elements to consider when deciding on monetary compensation, including:The seniority of the position on offer– how many people will they be managing? Will they be heading up important projects?The current labor market– will this be a difficult or easy position to fill?The current performance of your company– how much can you afford to pay a new candidate?The skills required for the job – are they rare? Do you need a specific combination of hard and soft skills?The salaries of others in the company– is the upper limit offered still within the bracket you have set for others at this level?Your location– are you based in an expensive city or area where more compensation is needed to make up for elevated living costs?The best way to avoid negotiation is to ensure your initial offer is attractive and fair compared to benchmarks within your industry. Use online tools such as PayScale and Glassdoor to look at salary benchmarks for similar roles within your sector. Remember that it is likely your candidate will also be using these tools to make their own comparisons.It is also vital to keep within existing pay levels within your company. Going above these may help you secure a candidate but can lead to issues further down the line where other team members may feel undervalued and demoralized.Find out your candidate’s current salaryThe candidate you are interviewing is under no obligation to tell you their current salary, but there is no harm in asking politely. This information is important when it comes to negotiating a salary. If their current salary is higher than your upper negotiating position, then it is time to question if they are the right candidate for you. This is best done early in the interviewing process. You can ask a candidate their desired salary in the interview to prepare for later negotiations and speed up the process. This allows you to root out candidates who are holding unrealistic salary expectations.Make a fair initial offerIf you want to avoid a lengthy negotiation period, make sure your initial salary offer is a fair one. Though it is not an official rule, it is a given that most professionals will be expecting at least a 20% pay rise when seeking a new position, particularly with the cost of living increasing. However attractive the position is and however great the benefits your company provides are, salary is still the main motivating factor for taking a role - you need to offer a fair package to a skilled candidate which remains within your company guidelines. Your offer needs to be a fair reflection of the candidate’s experience and skills.Lowballing your candidate in anticipation of a counteroffer will only lead to your candidate regarding your company with suspicion, and you may gain a reputation as a timewaster. Salary negotiations should not be treated the same way as trying to sell a used car. Consider the long-term impact of the hire during your negotiations. Making a fair offer will help bring more value to your company in the long run through the work of an employee who knows that they are respected and valued.Conversely, offering a very high number to your candidate can come across as desperate and make your candidate second guess their decision to take up the offer. Your candidate will be aware of the value of their current skill-set, and a high overvaluation can lead to further suspicion and hesitation from the employee. Finally, ensure your initial offer is lower than your upper range, which should have been decided before the job was advertised, to leave room for negotiation.Highlight benefits beyond salaryIf you are aware of competitors in your market who can provide bigger salary packages than you, consider the benefits of working for your company beyond the wage. Depending on your candidate, some of these benefits can be very attractive in helping improve the employee’s quality of life. If you are unable to completely match a salary request during a negotiation, there are other benefits you can offer that may entice a new employee to join. These could include:Additional or unlimited annual leave– a generous holiday offer, including the recent trend amongst start-ups to provide unlimited leave, shows a level of trust and value.Flexible working– Allowing employees to work from home one day a week or schedule their work around their lives using a flexi-time structure is particularly attractive to those with children.Professional development– If there are opportunities for the candidate to take on additional training, learn new skills or start a new progressive career track, there is more long-term value in taking the role offered.A positive company culture– If the candidate is coming from a toxic or high-pressured atmosphere where they experienced burn-out, it may be an important and attractive prospect to work in an office with a supportive and positive atmosphere. Statistics such as staff retention rates and testimonials from other employees can help support the representation of your culture.Perks- such as free gym membership, funding for travel into work, subsidized lunches, attractive office facilities, and social opportunities.These can all be compelling reasons for your ideal candidate to choose your role, even if the salary isn’t what they expected. These benefits can help employees save money, cut down on stress, and enjoy their role. This provides compensation which focuses on quality of life - which can be very appealing during negotiations.Offer alternative monetary benefitsIf you are facing troubles in salary negotiations and it looks like you may lose the candidate who will bring the most value to your company, it is worth considering offering additional monetary benefits. These can include:Performance-related bonuses– agree to pay a bonus if certain targets and milestones are hit.Commission– some roles can benefit from a commission rewards system, where the employee is compensated for business and leads generated for your company.A signing bonus– a one-off signing bonus rather than a higher salary bracket is often a great way of satisfying both parties. It shows enthusiasm for wanting to onboard the candidate quickly while saving your company on payroll in the long term.A later salary negotiation– if you are unsure about offering a higher salary bracket now, you can promise another negotiation over salary after a probation period, on completion of a training course or if a performance target is hit. It is vital that you do follow up on this promise, as you do not want to lose the trust of your new staff member.Shares or profit-sharing– get your candidate invested in the success of your company by offering shares as part of the job offer.The importance of feedbackProvide succinct feedbackYour feedback is the most important part of your communication with a rejected applicant. Good interview feedback needs to be succinct, considerate and honest. It is often the case that there was nothing particularly wrong with the candidate, but there just happened to be another candidate with more relevant experience or stronger skills. Stating this to a candidate should not offend their feelings—it’s the reality of job hunting in a busy and high-quality labour market. You don’t want to provide a lengthy critique which kicks your applicant when they’re down, but providing constructive and specific feedback will also be useful for your candidate.Request and value feedbackAnother way to show respect to a candidate and gain a brand advocate is to ask for feedback on your interviewing and hiring process. You have given your honest and succinct feedback, respect that hiring is a two-way street and request some feedback on their experience. You can do this either in your phone and email correspondence, or set up a feedback survey to collect data from several rejected candidates. Requesting feedback shows you value and trust the opinions and viewpoints of the candidate, alongside providing you as a hiring manager with useful insights on how you can further optimize and structure your recruitment and candidate search process.Be honest about future opportunitiesIn some cases, you may be rejecting a candidate you have a genuine interest in hiring in the future. Maybe they weren’t quite the right fit for the current role, but they may slot into your future growth plans. If this is the case, tell them. However, do not finish a job rejection on a false promise if you know you have no interest in hiring the candidate now or in the future. Only invite a candidate to apply for future roles if you think they would be a good cultural fit in your company in the future. Inform them if their details will be kept on file within your company for future positions.Gaining a brand advocate in a rejected candidateEnding a job rejection on a positive note is no mean feat, but it is the first step in nurturing and maintaining a good relationship with the candidate and gaining a brand advocate. You want to keep qualified candidates of exceptional quality active within your talent pool, and maintaining positive communication with a rejected candidate may save you on hiring times and costs at a future date. Stay in touch with rejected candidates, either via email or professional social media such as LinkedIn. Follow up on their progress, and congratulate them when you spot they have landed a new job.You can keep up communication through inviting rejected candidates to events or seminars hosted by your company, a networking opportunity for both you and your candidate. You can also ask to add the candidate to your email newsletter database, or suggest they follow your company on social media so they can stay informed on hiring and growth. Treat candidates as you would like to be treated. Keeping up positive, timely, succinct and direct communication will gain you a brand advocate and a new addition to your passive talent pool.These guidelines can help to negotiate and extend the perfect job offer that's impossible to refuse. Once the offer is made, this isn't the end of the process -the ball still remains in the candidate's court. As a talent specialist with a well-garnered candidate portfolio, we are a one-stop solution for all your talent needs. Contact us today and we can help in the job offer process.​View and download your free printable version below​

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How to Decide if a Job Offer is Worth Taking

​Landing a job offer is a great achievement and it can be tempting to grab it with both hands, particularly if you’ve been focused on the interview process for some time. Yes, crafting CVs and cover letters, researching companies and positions, preparing presentations, and attending interviews are all time and energy consuming parts of the process, especially for senior-executive level roles, but there are important considerations to be made before you make a concrete decision on one offer.You spend the majority of your day at work, and even outside of your time on the clock, your job will inevitably have an impact on your personal life, too, and even that of your family. For example, the length of your commute, the number of holiday days, and the flexibility the role offers will all affect your quality of life, and so it’s imperative that you accept a job offer for all the right reasons. Even your dream job role will have positives and negatives, and it is worth taking some time to consider the offer and what it means for your finances, your work-life balance, and your future. In this guide, we’ll walk you through the questions you should ask to help you decide if a job offer is worth taking, and how to decide whether to accept, reject or negotiate the role offered. If you are in the fortunate position of being able to consider several offers, this article can also help you with making your choice on which offer to accept. Am I happy with the salary offered?One of the headline aspects of a job offer to be considered is the salary on the table. Depending on where you are with your career, the salary should reflect your skill set and general value within the current labor market, and should ideally be at least 10% above your current salary package, otherwise the move may not be worth it. Use websites such as Glassdoor to research equivalent salaries and make sure you’re getting offered the right amount. Obviously, there is so much more to consider when thinking about a job, but if the salary is lower than you expected, you may want to consider negotiations. If the base salary is lower than you would like, your overall salary may be boosted with bonuses and/or commission, or you may be offered a salary package with perks such as subsidized health care or childcare. This is an opportunity to work out a package that suits you as an individual.The role may offer you a salary that is initially disappointing but puts you on a guaranteed and exciting career track with a larger reward in the near future. Also consider the satisfaction of the job if you are offered a big step-up in pay. What demands will this new role put on you? While an impressive new wage can be attractive, it may weigh lightly against the additional stress and pressure that comes from an increase in responsibility. It’s good to be challenged from a new role, but not at the expense of your long-term happiness, so it’s important to find the balance between financial compensation and quality of life.What are the benefits?Alongside the salary, look at the break down of benefits and perks offered by the new position. If these aren’t outlined fully in your job offer, request the full details from the hiring manager. Some companies offer bumper benefits packages, which can be considered as valuable as your initial salary package. Look at the following benefits when evaluating a job offer: Annual leave - is there a generous allowance for paid time away from the office? Does the role have a good pension? What is the employer contribution to your pension? How good is the health insurance provided by the company? What does it cover, specifically? Does the role provide large money-saving perks, such as a company car, subsidized childcare, or paid memberships?How will the role affect my work/life balance?Work/life balance is extremely important not only to your happiness, but also to your health, relationships, and even your success within your role. Consider the responsibilities of the role - are the day-to-day tasks stimulating and satisfying to you? Do they encompass the positive aspects of your previous role where you experienced success and growth? Will they challenge you to develop new skills/areas of expertise or are the tasks simply outside of your expertise or interests? Think of how the job will slot into your life, and how much control you will have over your work/life balance within the role. A large element to consider is whether the role offers flexible working, which may be particularly important if you have children. A role that allows employees to build their hours around their family obligations and provides regular opportunities to work from home can be far more appealing than a role that pays more but provides no flexibility. The commute also needs to be considered when evaluating a role for work/life balance. Is the role in a hard-to-reach location? Will you be dealing with daily traffic jams? Is the role reachable by public transport? How much will the commute cost in train tickets or petrol and parking? A job that requires a lot of travel can be exciting but can have a negative impact on your work/life balance as it can be tiring, costly, and time-consuming. If a lot of the role is spent ‘on the road’, you will need to consider how this will affect your quality of life long-term.Am I a good cultural fit?Hopefully, during your application and interview process, you will have had a taste of the company culture at your potential new organization. Review the business’s employer branding materials, their social media accounts, and testimonials on sites such as Glassdoor for more information. Your work environment is one of the most important factors to consider when deciding whether to accept a job offer. You will be spending around 40 hours a week there, so think carefully about whether that prospect makes you excited or anxious. Regardless of the job title, salary, or perks, accepting a job offer from a company where you will be glad to spend your time is what’s most important to your health and happiness.Lean into your intuition and consider any potential red flags you may have identified. In some instances, it may be appropriate to request another visit to the office to talk to team members before saying ‘yes’ to the offer, or you may request another more informal chat with your manager to ask any lingering cultural questions. This may help you to get a good sense of the types of personalities within the company, and find out how the office operates and where you would fit in. Are teams encouraged to work collaboratively, or do they tend to work as individuals? Is there good camaraderie within the team? How do they support each other? Ask for examples to get the best understanding. Can I work well with my peers?The people you work with, and indeed those you report to, can make or break a role. It is vital to your overall enjoyment of your job that you are working with people who bring out the best in you, as well as a team that will be receptive to your attempts to bring something new and beneficial to the company.When considering a job offer, try to find out who you will be reporting to and who will be reporting to you. It is likely that the former will have been involved in the hiring process, but if you haven’t met them, you may want to arrange a meeting or a phone call to discover more about their leadership style while you consider a job offer. Ask what would be expected of you in terms of delivery and performance and run through a typical week within your team. If the ideas and working style of those around and above you don’t run alongside your own you may want to reconsider taking the job offer and keep on looking.Does it advance my career?You’re already on the job hunt, so your career progression will naturally be on your mind at this point. You may have an offer for a role that advances your career immediately, but the move could be a bad decision in the long term. Does the current job offer allow for further growth of your skills and talents? Or are you moving into a position that may lack the challenge you need in order to develop? It’s a good idea to investigate the training and networking opportunities provided by the role. Do you have time in your role to learn new skills, or attend sector conferences that will keep you informed of trends in the market? Does the business have a budget reserved for career development and further education of its employees? LinkedIn is a good website to research this. You can look into the career paths of current and former employees and see how those within the company have progressed either internally or through new roles. You may want to reconsider a job offer for a role where there is little progression or growth, or from a company that has no immediate growth plans, or any career development programs. On the other hand, you may wish to include this in your negotiation process.Am I happy I got the job?Now you have considered the salary, the benefits, your work/life balance, the culture, your colleagues, and your career development goals, the final element to consider is your general ‘gut feeling’ when it comes to considering the job offer. Are you ecstatic to get the offer, or do you have your reservations? If you are reading this, there’s probably a reason you are taking your time to make a decision. Of course, there may be more personal factors at play that may incentivize you to accept a role quickly, but it is worth taking your time to consider how the prospect of starting this new position truly makes you feel. No job offer will be perfect, but it is important to trust your gut when an offer comes through, even if it just sparks some more honest negotiations. If you are unhappy with the lack of flexibility within the role or have doubts about opportunities for development, it may be better in the long-term to turn down the offer. Trust your instinct and intuition. If something is telling you taking the role is a bad idea, write up a list of pros and cons and weigh them up. Moving jobs is a big decision that affects many aspects of your life and steers your future. A bad gut feeling may be leading you to something better suited.

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private-wealth-management

How To Avoid Bias In Job Descriptions

​There is overwhelming evidence that companies with diverse workforces perform better on every possible metric, with diversity positively impacting every level of a business, from the cleaning staff to the board of directors. ​Bringing in as many perspectives, working styles and experience as possible to a workplace leads to integration, success and growth to those businesses who dedicate effort into attracting a diverse talent pool. The first step to make when aiming to achieve a balanced workforce is to ensure job advertisements avoid signs of unconscious bias. This helps present you as a welcoming and forward-thinking employer. You will also discover that your job positions attract a rich wealth of resumes after eliminating bias in your job descriptions. Biased job descriptions can discourage capable and talented candidates from applying for a role they are perfect for, and problems can be found both within the language and content of your job descriptions. Thankfully, it is easy to avoid bias in job descriptions through simple edits and considerations. Follow these rules to attract a diverse and successful talent pool.​What is Unconscious Bias?​Though the majority of us strive to encourage inclusiveness and diversity, unconscious bias incorporates the assumptions we make about groups based on gender, ethnicity, age and class due to the structures we live in. When writing job descriptions, this will most often come through in gendered or other biased language.  Unconscious bias can discourage qualified candidates who feel like a job description is looking for a specific type of person, and are unintentionally excluded. ​​Are Your Job Titles Inclusive?​Unconscious bias affects many aspects of language, through to job titles themselves. Many job titles are gendered, and successful efforts have been made to reframe traditional roles such as chairman (chairperson), fireman (firefighter) and councilman (council member).Even modern descriptors hold a bias. Have you ever seen a job from a hip company seeking a ‘rockstar’, a ‘guru’ or a ‘ninja’? These are fun titles which give candidates a vivid impression of a company's culture, but all of these terms still hold gendered connotations. A mother in her 40s with the qualifications and experience required may not want to apply for a role with ‘ninja’ in the title. These job titles can also give the (often false) impression of a company dominated by men or entrenched in a ‘lad’ culture where others are not welcome. ​Ensure your job titles are gender-neutral, avoid discouraging older applicants and are descriptive of what the job entails (e.g. ‘Magento Build Project Manager’).​​Use Gender-Neutral Pronouns​This is a fast and effective way of cleaning up your job descriptions, and a simple rule to follow when advertising new roles. Don’t include gender-specific pronouns in your job description. Stick to they/their and you when referring to the candidate. ‘S/he’ is also an acceptable replacement for gender-specific pronouns,  This rule also applies to collective nouns. Phrases such as ‘guys’ can be easily replaced with ‘team’ or ‘folks’. ​​Check For Biased Language​This is where judgement can be more complicated. When describing the ideal candidate for a role, job descriptions do lean towards using phrases which contain unconscious bias. For example, typically masculine traits include ‘assertive’ and ‘competitive’. While women have every ability to be assertive in the workplace, this can also be viewed as loyalty and supportiveness through a ‘feminine’ lens. This also works the other way. Roles which may be classically applied to by women may include words such as ‘bubbly’ or ‘nurturing’ to unconsciously encourage female applicants and discourage applications from men. ​​Avoid Presenting A Toxic Work Culture​When presenting your work culture, language choices can give applicants the vision of a ‘bro’ culture of after-work beers, chats about matchday and, in worse case scenarios, sexual harassment. Phrases such as ‘work hard, play hard’ and ‘banter’ will not only put off the majority of female applicants but many men too. Consider the wide spectrum of lifestyles your potential applicants could follow and elements of your work culture which will appeal to many, not just a single generation or lifestyle.​​Consider Your Job Requirements​Alongside bias in language, the general content of your job applications are worth reviewing to make them more inclusive. This includes avoiding job descriptions which contain an exhaustive list of skills needed for the role. In general, men are usually much more confident in their suitability for the roles they apply for, even if they don’t have all of the required skills for the role. Meanwhile, women are much more cautious about applying for roles. The more in-depth and specific a job description is, the less likely a qualified or near-qualified woman will apply for it, even if she ticks more boxes than a male applicant. Avoid this by outlining only the absolutely essential requirements for the role (such as education levels, years of experience, skills qualifications) followed by general ‘desired’ or ‘nice to have’ requirements. This will lift barriers to entry which often stop those with low confidence or imposter syndrome to apply. Provide a smaller amount of boxes to ‘tick’ to attract a larger and higher quality range of candidates. ​The best approach is to create descriptions which use succinct and direct language. Make your descriptions easy to follow, read and digest. ​​Use Online Tools To Eliminate Bias in Job DescriptionsLarger companies have now invested in software to help highlight and change job descriptions and other materials to remove signs of unconscious bias. Recruitment software OnGig uses a text analysis tool to help remove biased language. Textio is a leading ‘augmented writing’ software for recruiters which will eliminate gendered or biased language or job requirements while still ensuring your chosen language has the passion and impact you want to encourage applications. ​​Want to learn more about diverse recruitment strategies? Contact Our Team​

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private-wealth-management

Top Trends to Improve your ED&I Strategy

​The global relevance of equity, diversity, and inclusion (ED&I), as a business value and organising principle, remains a key concern for recruiters and many organisations. ED&I is a powerful enabler of innovation and growth; companies that lead with this progressive course of action, not only address systemic barriers, but drive impactful change within all areas of the corporate ecosystem.The U.S. leadership team at Selby Jennings collated insights and shared their learnings from this year’s National Diversity & Leadership Conference. The annual event, which was broadcasted virtually on April 21st-22nd and 28th-29th, aimed to empower and equip attendees with valuable resources to advocate for a more equitable, diverse, and inclusive workplace.The theme from this year’s conference is: ‘Be a Changemaker’. How can recruiters and enterprise leaders become an inclusive changemaker? You don’t have to move mountains; it starts by crafting a holistic ED&I initiative that covers all processes and practices, paving the way for the future.  Key topics include:    ED&I Efforts: An Enabler of Innovation   Internal and External ED&I Strategies    Leading with Emotional Intelligence  Talent Comes in All Shades Download the report to discover how to build a successful ED&I strategy:

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5 Self-Care Practices that Put Your Mental Health First Image
private-wealth-management

5 Self-Care Practices that Put Your Mental Health First

​In light of the anxiety and stress caused by the global health crisis and its fallout, it’s no wonder that many have felt the weight of the past twelve months on their shoulders. Social isolation, video call fatigue, and an increase in employee burnout are some of the driving factors impacting the lives of so many this year. Whether you are struggling to stay motivated, feeling overwhelmed about returning to the office, or the pandemic has taken a strain on your overall mental health, making room for wellness practices may help you achieve a mentally healthy mind, body, and soul. Here are 5 strategies to get you started!​1. Get MovingStudy after study shows that exercise improves your mental and physical wellbeing. Even though exercise itself acts as a stressor, it reduces the harmful effects of other stressors and can act as a remedy to stress, depression, and other negative emotions. Overwhelmingly, the evidence shows that exercise helps your brain to function properly by increasing cerebral blood flow, which has positive effects on mental health, cognition, and brain activity. While the wet weather may make a jog seem less than appealing, there are plenty of ways you can incorporate a little bit of movement into your work day. Take the stairs instead of the lift. Take at least 20 minutes away from your laptop and go for a walk outside and grab yourself a coffee from that great place down the street, whatever the weather. Small steps can make a big difference to your mood. It’s recommended that the average adult should seek to achieve 10,000 steps of daily activity, so boost your mood by taking walk intervals between work and home. ​2. Declutter your WorkspaceScientists have found that a cluttered environment may make it more difficult for us to focus. Researchers hypothesize that multiple objects compete for neural representation in the visual cortex – explaining why we may feel more unfocused when there’s a lot of clutter around us. Having an organized place for all your essentials can enable you to think more clearly while working; improving productivity and reducing stress levels. Invest in some personal items to make your space feel more pleasant. Add a luscious green plant to purify the air or a framed photo of someone you love. All these things can serve as a motivator for why you work hard at what you do.If you’re working from home, the distinction between your workspace and your living space might have been blurred. To remedy to this disruption, create boundaries. Close your laptop, put your notebook away and come back raring to go.​3. Music Music can have a profound effect on your mood. Similarly to exercise, listening to music can improve blood flow, lower levels of stress-related hormones like cortisol, and ease pain.According to Kim Innes, a professor of epidemiology at West Virginia University’s School of Public Health, music seems to “selectively activate” neurochemical systems and brain structures associated with positive mood, emotion regulation, attention and memory in ways that promote beneficial changes. A 2015 review in The Lancet found that people who listened to music before, during, or after surgery experience less pain and anxiety compare to those who didn’t listen to music. Most astonishingly, they didn’t even need as much pain medication.You just need to find the right playlist.​4. Connect Altruism has many personal benefits. Using MRI scans, multiple neuroscience studies have found that when we do something nice for someone else, the brains activate in regions that signal pleasure and reward.Stuck for ideas on how to add a little altruism to your work day? Here are a few suggestions of what you can do: Pass it on: Pay for a stranger’s coffee or donate to charity. Reconnect with someone: Drop a text or LinkedIn message to an old colleague you haven’t spent time with in a while.Give an unexpected gift to a colleague: Give them a book they mentioned they wanted to read or surprise them with a delivery of their favorite pastry in the morning.Thank someone who made a difference to your professional life: Whether a teacher, professor or mentor, let someone know how they helped you with your career.Keep track of your acts of kindness to reinforce a positive association between work and those fuzzy feelings.​5. Find a new job that makes you happyIf all of the above fails, perhaps it’s time to rethink your job. If your stress at work spills into your home life and most days at work seem to make you unhappy, maybe your role is the root of the problem. Whether you have an unsupportive boss, an unclear path to promotion, or feel undervalued, there are many valid reasons for feeling unhappy in your job.Alternatively, if you don’t want a career change and working patterns arise as the problem, ask your employer for strategies to reduce stress. Although it may be a challenge to find a job that offers the perfect recipe, pursuing a new career path may help build a healthy self-esteem and boost your overall well-being.Need help? Feel free to get in touch with us, for personal career advice. 

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Performance over Presence Image
private-wealth-management

Performance over Presence

​Change may well be on the horizon and is accelerating exponentially. At the beginning of 2020, many financial services companies were firmly thrust into a remote working trajectory, a watershed year for digital transformation within the workplace. For the past year, the high-speed mass adoption of flexible working required employers to redefine and re-examine the workplace. If flexible agility, hybrid cloud infrastructures, and open banking are signs of permanent change, what does this mean for financial services organizations?Our latest Career Insight, ‘Performance over Presence’ offers an in-depth analysis into the hybrid-remote approach; a business model which intertwines telecommuting with working present on-site. If the evolving experience-based hybrid approach is to be established, institutions may be likely to explore the potential benefits and caveats to this structure. With this new-found employee sentiment, does the hybrid-remote model support workers and simultaneously avoid an eroding of company culture? How can leaders manage performance with geographically dispersed teams? Can hybrid working arrangements prevent a cacophony between employers and employees? At Selby Jennings, these are the questions that have defined our post-pandemic conversations. Perhaps, the hybrid approach allows employees to be part of the calculation and offers a window into a more purpose-driven and brighter future for the workplace. ​

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