Compliance

Compliance

Compliance Jobs

Compliance Officer (m/w/d)

Role: Compliance Officer Location: Frankfurt Salary: Competitive and Candidate Dependent Reporting To: Head of Compliance We are currently representing large international investment bank, located in Frankfurt. In addition to its central Frankfurt office, the company maintains branches in two other big cities in Europe to expand its presence in France and the Iberian Peninsula. Emphasizing client-oriented services, the company offers a diverse array of offerings, including the origination, sales, and trading of financial instruments in debt, rates, and equity markets. The Candidate At least 1-3 years of experience in compliance or AML in a financial institution Successful completion of a Master's degree or equivalent in Law, Business Management, Economics, or a related field. Fluency and proficiency in both German and English, with additional language skills in French or Spanish being advantageous. Knowledge of German and European regulatory requirements concerning the conduct of business and financial crime. Excellent communication skills and the ability to thrive in a dynamic international environment. Strong analytical skills and proficiency in relevant IT tools, including MS Office. The Role Conducting regular compliance surveillance checks, which involve monitoring business operations, systems, and controls. Performing specific compliance monitoring focused on key regulations, conducting thorough reviews, and leading compliance investigations. Managing standard and complex queries from various business units and international support areas, collaborating closely with the Client Onboarding Team and employees on AML and KYC matters. Providing support for compliance and AML-related projects. Assisting in the creation and updating of annual Compliance and AML Risk Assessments. Contributing to the maintenance and ongoing development of MHEU Compliance policies, procedures, forms, and compliance memos. Participating in internal and external audit activities, including addressing and remedying audit findings.

Negotiable
Frankfurt (Oder)
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Compliance Officer

You play a key role in expanding our knowledge and awareness in the compliance field. Your expertise guides the business in understanding and putting into action various laws and regulations. Additionally, you're responsible for creating and up keeping policies, procedures, and guidelines while keeping a close watch on the organisation to ensure compliance. As a Compliance Officer, you have a strong grasp of areas like duty of care, customer due diligence, and privacy regulations. What are you going to do: You create annual compliance plans, Monitor the progress, and make changes as needed. You will be responsible for the development and implementation of the company's compliance policy, ensuring adherence to relevant laws and regulations. Your role involves enhancing the professionalism of the Compliance Framework and ensuring that compliance is verified. You will oversee the conduction of compliance risk analyses on specific subjects, such as new products, organisational changes, and large-scale projects. Gather and go over compliance reports with various levels of the organisation and customers. Arrange meetings with clients to address various compliance issues. What you bring: Good understanding of the relevant laws and regulations that apply to financial institutions, like the Wft, Wwft, and the guidelines set by regulatory authorities. HBO or WO Background, such as law or business economics We are looking for candidates with excellent Dutch and English oral and written communication skills.

Negotiable
Netherlands
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Software Development Engineer in Test

Selby Jennings has partnered with a Chicago-based clearing house that is looking for an experienced Software Development Engineer in Test (SDET) to join their team! The SDET will have the following responsibilities: Developing and enhancing automation frameworks Collaborating with others to deliver on complex projects using multiple systems Analyzing test results Identifying quality tasks during automation tests The SDET will have the following qualifications: 5+ years of experience working in Agile software development environment BS in Computer Science, Mathematics, or similar field Technical skills in programming languages (python, Java, C++, Javascript, R, etc) Technical skills in automated testing frameworks (Cucumber, TestNG, Selenium, etc)

Negotiable
Chicago
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Internal Auditing Roles- SOX, Compliance, and IT

A leading Medical Sciences and Technology firm based in Chicago is looking to make multiple hires of various levels to their SOX, IT, and Compliance Audit teams. The firm is a fortune 500 and has multiple lines of business, including Medical Devices, Diagnostics, R&D, Device Procurement, and more. In this role, you'll be working closely with the business to perform financial audits, test control effectiveness, provide recommendations for better risk-control processes, and interacting frequently with senior stakeholders and regulatory bodies. The team is accountable for auditing domestic and international entities and in this role, you get the opportunity to take on ownership in audit projects and travel around the world. What's unique about this opportunity is that the Audit group is a completely rotational program, consisting of a 2-year rotation to get an expert understanding of the financials of the business. After completing the rotation, you get the opportunity to move out of audit and into a more business-facing role. This is an essential part of the firm's culture promoting organic growth and this is one of the ways they get future leaders into their internal pipeline. Responsibilities Include: Perform financial audits of firm's domestic and international affiliates Successfully complete audits from all stages: planning, fieldwork, wrap-up Document all audit work in a clear manner Assess accuracy/adequacy of financial statements, internal controls, and identify business process improvements Provide input on risks and controls while maintaining independence Qualifications: BA/BS in Accounting, Finance, or equivalent experience 3-6 busy seasons in internal/external audit practice of a public accounting firm, Big 4 highly preferred Strong understanding of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX); experience in performing financial statement audits for SEC clients and/or SOX process and controls Project management experience Manufacturing and/or international business experience preferred CPA or other certification (CFE, CIA, CMA) highly preferred 40-60% travel to firm's International and Domestic locations required

US$90000 - US$110000 per year
Chicago
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Compliance Testing Officer

Role: Compliance Testing Officer Location: Amsterdam Salary: Competitive and Candidate Dependent Reporting To: Head of Compliance Testing, Amsterdam We are currently representing a multinational Corporate Bank, situated in Amsterdam. The role itself comes with plenty of responsibility - you will be assisting the head of compliance testing and team of 3 compliance testing officers, in developing and executing an annual testing plan to cover 8 locations across Europe. The Candidate 2+ years' of experience gained from Compliance, AFC, Audit, Risk or other type of regulatory background within the financial services industry Strong knowledge of the financial markets rules and regulations on compliance and AFC topics, with a focus on the EU laws Understanding of compliance and financial crime risks and internal controls Understanding of banking business environment and products Excellent communication skills, with the ability to communicate across all three lines of defence and to describe complex cases Fluent in English, and any other language is a bonus The Role Support the creation of the multi-year testing plan for all in-scope countries that covers the right risks and is in line with the global methodology Undertake testing activities according to the testing plan to satisfy the mandatory and risk based requirements for testing, to the deadlines agreed and the standards defined in the global testing framework Communicate testing results using high quality reports Proactively engage with the business to agree issues and remediation actions from testing Activities Update the relevant tracking system timely and accurately with information on the reviews, tests, checks and their progress Support continuous enhancement of the testing programme by identifying improvements and implementing them, while ensuring the programme remains aligned to the global framework Establish and maintain effective communication channels and working relationships with the relevant stakeholders in the business and other control functions (e.g. DCO, BCU, NFRM, Internal Audit, COO, Risk, etc.) to ensure a coordinated approach and effective resolution of issues

Negotiable
Amsterdam
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Compliance Officer ( Business management)

Introduction Our client, a prominent asset management firm based in Amsterdam, is seeking a Compliance Officer with 5 to 7 years of experience in overseeing compliance risks within the financial services industry. In this role, you will support the Chief Compliance Officer and the team manager in Business Development/Management & Change, undertaking a diverse range of responsibilities. Your duties will include establishing compliance policies and setting minimum standards, development of a risk mitigation control framework, supporting Security Incident Response and SIRA, and more. Additionally, you will actively participate in different projects, providing expert compliance knowledge and translating it into solutions. Responsibilities - Collaborate with fellow Compliance Officers in activities such as risk assessments, process designs, and more. - Develop policies and process documentation. - Familiarity with financial instruments and investments, proficiency in handling data and IT, and a keen interest in digitalization. - Develop project plans and define pragmatic solutions ensuring compliance to regulations and legislation. - Good communication in English and Dutch Skills - Strong analytical and problem-solving skills. - Excellent written and verbal communication skills. - Ability to work independently and as part of a team. - Ability to prioritize and manage multiple tasks. - Strong attention to detail. - Ability to work under pressure and meet deadlines.

Negotiable
Amsterdam
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Senior Compliance Officer (Account Management)

Job Description Your responsibilities include enhancing collaboration with colleagues in the first line, ensuring that responsibilities are appropriately allocated within the organization, and timely engagement of internal specialists. Requirements: 5+ years in compliance Experience in compliance risk management in the financial services industry; Encouraging open collaboration and implementing effective checks and balances are integral to your efforts in preventing abuses and incidents. Possessing expertise in the Compliance Risk Management Cycle, you have actively advised on identifying integrity risks and provided guidance on internal corporate governance and emerging regulations. Your extensive and in-depth knowledge of Asset Management, encompassing products, services, and processes, enables you to adeptly translate this understanding into effective compliance risk management strategies. Proficient in both spoken and written English

Negotiable
Amsterdam
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Compliance Manager

A European Insurance Group is seeking a compliance manager to oversee their German region. This insurer specializes in the insurance of appliances and consumer products and due to their premier services they are currently undergoing organic growth. The compliance department has a very dynamic structure and is reporting directly into the European Head of Compliance. Your Responsibilities: Stay up to date with any regulatory changes and ensure effective implementation into the groups framework. Monitor and perform control of the activities and processes of the company to best mitigate any risks. Provide compliance training to the staff and consistently promote compliance matters internally. Communicate with the regulators and prepare documents upon requests. Your Experience: 3 years or more of experience within the financial services industry. Ideally having worked in a relatively independent role where you are used to dynamically implement policies and procedures. Good analytical and communication skills with a solutions mindset. Fluency in German and English, a third language is considered an advantage.

Negotiable
Germany
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Markets Compliance Manager

A multinational and universal banking group which is putting an additional focus on their Paris office is currently seeking a Compliance Advisory Manager for the Capital Markets Compliance team in Paris. You would be reporting directly into the Head of Markets Compliance and work with a broad range of products. Your Role: Providing compliance oversight for the Continental European entity on a broad range of products including cash equities, derivatives, FX, securitised products, etc. Stay up to date with all relevant regulations to the markets space, including Market Abuse (MAR), AMF, MIFID, Surveillance activities, etc. Conduct regulatory reviews related to various products and business activities. Provide advise to the traders in real time. Liaise effectively with key stakeholder across departments and management. Your Profile: 4+ years of experience in markets compliance and advisory Ideally experience and knowledge of MAR and Surveillance Strong verbal and written communication skills in English and French. Proven to be pro-active and able to take initiatives in dynamic and high-paced

Negotiable
Paris
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Quantitative Researcher

I am working with a global, multi-strategy hedge fund in New York City that is looking to add a data scientist or quantitative researcher to join their hypothesis-driven data science research team that combines the most innovative data analyses and quantitative tools with the firm's fundamental research within their merger/risk arbitrage, credit, long/short equity, and real estate strategies. You will be working directly with multiple investment teams on a daily basis, and even have the ability to generate your own data-driven insights. Responsibilities: Develop and maintain mission-critical data pipelines and analytical tools that streamline and scale the data engineering life-cycle from ingestion to insight Support day-to-day research operations of the team and take part in continuous improvements to research quality by applying creative problem-solving to a wide variety of research questions Job Requirements: Masters or bachelors required (Min: 3.6 GPA) from a top accredited university Extensive experience working with alternative data on either buy-side or sell-side Highly skilled in Python and SQL

US$200000 - US$600000 per year
New York
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AFC Officer (m/w/d)

A banking conglomerate is in search of an AFC Officer to join their team in Frankfurt. This role involves collaboration within a global team dedicated to combating financial crime. Key Responsibilities: Evaluate AFC risk events (SAR) related to specific correspondent banking relationships. Offer support in determining appropriate actions for correspondent banking relationships, based on identified financial crime risk themes and typologies. Participate in targeted reviews of correspondent bank customers by engaging with the business and Regional AFC teams. Foster a partnership with Global Financial Crime Operations teams to gather crucial information on AFC risk events. Qualifications: Ideally, a minimum of 3 years of experience in Financial Crime Compliance within a financial institution or consulting firm. Previous exposure to regulators and/or correspondent banking products and services is advantageous. Demonstrated initiative, a strong work ethic, analytical skills, and excellent attention to detail are essential. Proficiency in both spoken and written German and English is required due to the client segment and nature of the role. Additional language skills in Arabic, Portuguese, or French would be beneficial.

Negotiable
Frankfurt am Main
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Head of Compliance & Financial Crime

We are seeking an Executive Director- Head of Compliance & Financial crime for an Investment Banking client in Luxembourg. The successful candidate will be responsible for ensuring that the company has an effective financial crime and compliance program in place. Your responsibility entails recognizing regulatory obligations and crafting, revising, and upholding the pertinent sections of the manual, guidelines, policies, and procedures related to Compliance and Financial Crime (FCC) to align with both local and global standard. Responsibilities: Create and keep up-to-date policies and training to prevent money laundering. Make sure the company follows the rules and safeguards against financial crimes, market abuse, and regulatory violations in the region. Evaluate new laws and policies to see how they affect Luxembourg businesses related to Compliance and FCC. Share this information with top management and suggest necessary changes to stay compliant. Take part in business meetings and groups, offering your expertise on regulatory issues in Compliance and FCC risk. Supervise the local regulatory requirements, including MIFID & MIFID rules, Market Abuse Regime (MAR) rules, Conduct of Business rules, AML Transaction Monitoring, Sanctions, KYC aspects (PEPs, CDD & EDD), Regulatory Reporting (when necessary), and provide management with relevant information. Offer proactive Compliance and FCC advice to management and staff in various business areas, including input and guidance on strategy, new products, and key decisions that could involve Compliance and FCC risks. Train new employees and provide additional regulatory training as needed on topics related to Compliance and FCC.

Negotiable
Luxembourg
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Compliance News & Insights

Embracing Disabled Talent: Driving Success Through Inclusive Hiring in Europe Image
risk-management

Embracing Disabled Talent: Driving Success Through Inclusive Hiring in Europe

In today's evolving business landscape, recognizing and embracing diversity and inclusion is crucial. Despite progress, the potential of disabled talent remains largely underappreciated in Europe. Recent findings from our Selby Jennings poll shed light on the current state of affairs, with 55% of respondents admitting their hiring strategies lack provisions for candidates with disabilities. However, it is encouraging to note that 72% of workplaces have policies and practices in place to support employees with disabilities.The Missed OpportunityLack of Provisions and Representation: The finding that 55% of organizations do not have provisions for candidates with disabilities in their hiring strategies is a wake-up call. It indicates a significant missed opportunity to engage with a pool of talented individuals. Furthermore, the survey reveals that disabled individuals are particularly underrepresented in the banking and financial sector, with 78% of respondents recognizing the need for better representation. This highlights the need for a paradigm shift in how organizations approach hiring and inclusion.Policies, Practices, and Managerial Support: On a positive note, 72% of workplaces have implemented policies and practices to support employees with disabilities. This demonstrates an increasing commitment to inclusivity. Additionally, 73% of respondents believe their managers are equipped to manage employees with disabilities, indicating progress in fostering an inclusive work environment. However, it is important to ensure ongoing training and support for managers to effectively accommodate and empower their disabled team members.The Benefits of Complete InclusivityEmbracing complete inclusivity offers numerous advantages for businesses. First and foremost, it fosters a culture of equality, respect, and diversity. By hiring disabled talent, organizations can ensure they have a vast pool of skills, perspectives, and problem-solving abilities. This diversity drives innovation, creativity, and productivity, leading to better outcomes and a competitive edge. Moreover, a truly inclusive workplace enhances employee morale, engagement, and retention, as team members feel valued and supported.Embracing Disabled Talent - The Path to SuccessEmploying disabled banking and finance professionals can be a game-changer. Their unique insights, adaptability, and resilience brings fresh perspectives to financial institutions. By leveraging their talents, organizations can drive innovation, enhance customer service, and make informed decisions that cater to a broader demographic. Embracing this is a strategic move that positions businesses for long-term success.Taking Action - The Call for Inclusive HiringHiring disabled talent in Europe is not only essential for business success, but also for creating a more inclusive society. Embracing complete inclusivity brings diverse perspectives, encourages innovation, and engages the workforce. With the potential to access over 2 million candidates worldwide, Selby Jennings provides a unique opportunity to engage with talent from various backgrounds, including disabled professionals. By partnering with Selby Jennings, organizations in Europe can expand their reach, access a diverse pool of skilled candidates, and further enhance their inclusivity efforts. Request a call back today and together, we can build a prosperous future that celebrates the contributions of all individuals.

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insurance-and-actuarial

2023 Bonus Season Breakdown

Discover the latest analysis of bonuses and rewards in the Financial Sciences & Services industry, and how it impacts the talent market.Understanding bonus structure has become not only a critical aspect to businesses in attracting and retaining top talent, but also for professionals in knowing their true value.Analysing the rewards arrangement across the Finance and Banking industry, we surveyed over 2,000 professionals based in Europe to discover:What value their bonuses are Whether they are satisfied with their bonusKey drivers behind their bonus pay-outsPerformance metrics used to determine bonuses Offering valuable insights to both professionals looking to benchmark themselves, and for businesses reflecting on their compensation strategies, both parties can take away a number of key considerations from this exclusive report. ​Download your copy of the 'Bonus Season Breakdown' report by completing the form below:​

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How to Make the Perfect Job Offer Image
private-wealth-management

How to Make the Perfect Job Offer

​Finding the perfect candidate for your latest role can be a long and arduous road. Once you have found the employee with the skills you need and an attitude which will fit perfectly within your team, it is time to make your job offer. In a perfect world, you will get an enthusiastic acceptance. However, if you are hiring in a busy sector, or trying it, is likely you may have to negotiate salary and other benefits before you can seal the deal.Competition for talent is fierce. The pressure is on for hiring managers to secure the right candidate by offering an attractive compensation package before they accept an offer from a competitor. The aim of a salary negotiation is not to find a compromise where both parties are dissatisfied but find a balance where you both come out feeling valued, and enthusiastic about moving forward. Negotiating salary can be a tricky business that requires a high level of strategy.​Set your limits before you advertise the jobSalary negotiations can be complicated - planning will give you an obvious advantage. Before you even start interviewing your candidates, you need to choose the right salary to advertise, including the upper limit to where you are willing to negotiate for an exceptional candidate.Your lowest salary offer should still be in line with industry standards, with your upper limit reserved for excellent candidates who will offer extra value to the role. Don’t include your upper salary limit in any of your job advertising or recruitment efforts. There are several elements to consider when deciding on monetary compensation, including:The seniority of the position on offer– how many people will they be managing? Will they be heading up important projects?The current labor market– will this be a difficult or easy position to fill?The current performance of your company– how much can you afford to pay a new candidate?The skills required for the job – are they rare? Do you need a specific combination of hard and soft skills?The salaries of others in the company– is the upper limit offered still within the bracket you have set for others at this level?Your location– are you based in an expensive city or area where more compensation is needed to make up for elevated living costs?The best way to avoid negotiation is to ensure your initial offer is attractive and fair compared to benchmarks within your industry. Use online tools such as PayScale and Glassdoor to look at salary benchmarks for similar roles within your sector. Remember that it is likely your candidate will also be using these tools to make their own comparisons.It is also vital to keep within existing pay levels within your company. Going above these may help you secure a candidate but can lead to issues further down the line where other team members may feel undervalued and demoralized.Find out your candidate’s current salaryThe candidate you are interviewing is under no obligation to tell you their current salary, but there is no harm in asking politely. This information is important when it comes to negotiating a salary. If their current salary is higher than your upper negotiating position, then it is time to question if they are the right candidate for you. This is best done early in the interviewing process. You can ask a candidate their desired salary in the interview to prepare for later negotiations and speed up the process. This allows you to root out candidates who are holding unrealistic salary expectations.Make a fair initial offerIf you want to avoid a lengthy negotiation period, make sure your initial salary offer is a fair one. Though it is not an official rule, it is a given that most professionals will be expecting at least a 20% pay rise when seeking a new position, particularly with the cost of living increasing. However attractive the position is and however great the benefits your company provides are, salary is still the main motivating factor for taking a role - you need to offer a fair package to a skilled candidate which remains within your company guidelines. Your offer needs to be a fair reflection of the candidate’s experience and skills.Lowballing your candidate in anticipation of a counteroffer will only lead to your candidate regarding your company with suspicion, and you may gain a reputation as a timewaster. Salary negotiations should not be treated the same way as trying to sell a used car. Consider the long-term impact of the hire during your negotiations. Making a fair offer will help bring more value to your company in the long run through the work of an employee who knows that they are respected and valued.Conversely, offering a very high number to your candidate can come across as desperate and make your candidate second guess their decision to take up the offer. Your candidate will be aware of the value of their current skill-set, and a high overvaluation can lead to further suspicion and hesitation from the employee. Finally, ensure your initial offer is lower than your upper range, which should have been decided before the job was advertised, to leave room for negotiation.Highlight benefits beyond salaryIf you are aware of competitors in your market who can provide bigger salary packages than you, consider the benefits of working for your company beyond the wage. Depending on your candidate, some of these benefits can be very attractive in helping improve the employee’s quality of life. If you are unable to completely match a salary request during a negotiation, there are other benefits you can offer that may entice a new employee to join. These could include:Additional or unlimited annual leave– a generous holiday offer, including the recent trend amongst start-ups to provide unlimited leave, shows a level of trust and value.Flexible working– Allowing employees to work from home one day a week or schedule their work around their lives using a flexi-time structure is particularly attractive to those with children.Professional development– If there are opportunities for the candidate to take on additional training, learn new skills or start a new progressive career track, there is more long-term value in taking the role offered.A positive company culture– If the candidate is coming from a toxic or high-pressured atmosphere where they experienced burn-out, it may be an important and attractive prospect to work in an office with a supportive and positive atmosphere. Statistics such as staff retention rates and testimonials from other employees can help support the representation of your culture.Perks- such as free gym membership, funding for travel into work, subsidized lunches, attractive office facilities, and social opportunities.These can all be compelling reasons for your ideal candidate to choose your role, even if the salary isn’t what they expected. These benefits can help employees save money, cut down on stress, and enjoy their role. This provides compensation which focuses on quality of life - which can be very appealing during negotiations.Offer alternative monetary benefitsIf you are facing troubles in salary negotiations and it looks like you may lose the candidate who will bring the most value to your company, it is worth considering offering additional monetary benefits. These can include:Performance-related bonuses– agree to pay a bonus if certain targets and milestones are hit.Commission– some roles can benefit from a commission rewards system, where the employee is compensated for business and leads generated for your company.A signing bonus– a one-off signing bonus rather than a higher salary bracket is often a great way of satisfying both parties. It shows enthusiasm for wanting to onboard the candidate quickly while saving your company on payroll in the long term.A later salary negotiation– if you are unsure about offering a higher salary bracket now, you can promise another negotiation over salary after a probation period, on completion of a training course or if a performance target is hit. It is vital that you do follow up on this promise, as you do not want to lose the trust of your new staff member.Shares or profit-sharing– get your candidate invested in the success of your company by offering shares as part of the job offer.The importance of feedbackProvide succinct feedbackYour feedback is the most important part of your communication with a rejected applicant. Good interview feedback needs to be succinct, considerate and honest. It is often the case that there was nothing particularly wrong with the candidate, but there just happened to be another candidate with more relevant experience or stronger skills. Stating this to a candidate should not offend their feelings—it’s the reality of job hunting in a busy and high-quality labour market. You don’t want to provide a lengthy critique which kicks your applicant when they’re down, but providing constructive and specific feedback will also be useful for your candidate.Request and value feedbackAnother way to show respect to a candidate and gain a brand advocate is to ask for feedback on your interviewing and hiring process. You have given your honest and succinct feedback, respect that hiring is a two-way street and request some feedback on their experience. You can do this either in your phone and email correspondence, or set up a feedback survey to collect data from several rejected candidates. Requesting feedback shows you value and trust the opinions and viewpoints of the candidate, alongside providing you as a hiring manager with useful insights on how you can further optimize and structure your recruitment and candidate search process.Be honest about future opportunitiesIn some cases, you may be rejecting a candidate you have a genuine interest in hiring in the future. Maybe they weren’t quite the right fit for the current role, but they may slot into your future growth plans. If this is the case, tell them. However, do not finish a job rejection on a false promise if you know you have no interest in hiring the candidate now or in the future. Only invite a candidate to apply for future roles if you think they would be a good cultural fit in your company in the future. Inform them if their details will be kept on file within your company for future positions.Gaining a brand advocate in a rejected candidateEnding a job rejection on a positive note is no mean feat, but it is the first step in nurturing and maintaining a good relationship with the candidate and gaining a brand advocate. You want to keep qualified candidates of exceptional quality active within your talent pool, and maintaining positive communication with a rejected candidate may save you on hiring times and costs at a future date. Stay in touch with rejected candidates, either via email or professional social media such as LinkedIn. Follow up on their progress, and congratulate them when you spot they have landed a new job.You can keep up communication through inviting rejected candidates to events or seminars hosted by your company, a networking opportunity for both you and your candidate. You can also ask to add the candidate to your email newsletter database, or suggest they follow your company on social media so they can stay informed on hiring and growth. Treat candidates as you would like to be treated. Keeping up positive, timely, succinct and direct communication will gain you a brand advocate and a new addition to your passive talent pool.These guidelines can help to negotiate and extend the perfect job offer that's impossible to refuse. Once the offer is made, this isn't the end of the process -the ball still remains in the candidate's court. As a talent specialist with a well-garnered candidate portfolio, we are a one-stop solution for all your talent needs. Contact us today and we can help in the job offer process.​View and download your free printable version below​

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How to Get the Most Out of a Long and Challenging Interview Process Image
sales-and-trading

How to Get the Most Out of a Long and Challenging Interview Process

​Interviewing at a banking or financial services firm, particularly for senior-executive level positions, will often entail a rigorous process that includes a lot of prep, energy, and tough technical questions to assess if you have the necessary skills and knowledge to tackle the role. In certain instances, you may even be invited to attend an all-day interview, which entails multiple rounds of exchanges with stakeholders and HR managers to determine how your skillset and character might fit into the company. This type of interview is of course intended to challenge you in a variety of ways, but while it can be tough, it is a valuable experience and an opportunity to get to know the company and the people who make it.If you are called to one of these marathon interviews, it’s important to set yourself up for success in advance, which doesn’t just mean pouring over interview questions and company information. Taking care of yourself both mentally and physically in the run up to such an exciting but demanding opportunity is equally as important as preparing your answers in that fatigue and stress can quickly derail your efforts. This article will guide you to set yourself up for a positive outcome when approaching a long and challenging interview process, whether it’s a job offer or a valuable experience to carry with you for next time. The full pictureBeing called for an interview is a great feeling. It affirms that your CV has hit the mark and that the hiring manager wants to find out more about what you have to offer. The interview itself can challenge you in ways you might not have expected, and in some cases can be a long and demanding process both mentally and physically, but it’s important to remember that if you’re not being challenged, the role might not offer you the right level of growth and development that will keep you fulfilled. Essentially, it’s not supposed to be a breeze.In particular, the idea of an all-day interview can be extremely intimidating, and a certain level of nerves can be a good thing. Single interviews are challenging in their own way, but are typically over in about an hour, while an all-day interview is an entirely different ball game involving meetings with several senior stakeholders within a company to gain different perspectives on your suitability. Depending on the role you are applying for, all-day interviews can come in a range of formats. For example, they may involve a mixture of exercises relevant to your role, plus general tests to check your culture fit, such as personality and IQ tests. This means that you are being tested on things that you can prepare for and traits that are innate to you. Therefore, while reading up on information that can support your professional assessment is one way to prepare, you’ll also need to start the day well rested and calm in order to present the best version of the full picture. Be prepared These interview processes are designed to push you out of your comfort zone and so preparation will be your greatest ally to help you keep your cool and put your best foot forward. Your potential new employers are attempting to gain a full picture of what you are about, from your skills and experience to your attitude and cultural fit and so however talented, experienced, and confident you are in your fit for the role, there will be elements of the process that will challenge you, demanding thorough preparation. Here are some tips to help you to prepare before you walk through the door. Request a scheduleThis is vital in terms of mentally preparing for an all-day interview. Knowing how the day will be laid out will help you get into the headspace of what is expected from you, helping to keep you calm and avoiding anything that might throw you off. You may have four very long interviews, or twelve very short interviews. Whatever the format, you need to make sure you are mentally prepared for what you are facing, and pace yourself around those all important breaks. Request this a few days before your interview to give the employer time to check everyone’s schedules. Find out the names and job titles of each of your interviewersLook up their LinkedIn pages and find out their experience and expertise, and what relationship they may have with you if you win the position. If they are thought leaders, read their articles and blogs to find out their views on your industry. Researching your interviewers means you can find out how you can relate to them both personally and professionally, which will make them easier to engage with on the day. Prepare questions for your employer A day-long interview is an opportunity for you to get an impression of the institution you are hoping to work for from several angles. Think of all the information you want to gain from the different interviews and ensure you have prepared questions to ask each of them. This also takes the pressure off yourself during each interview and allows for breathing space. And in addition, your interviewers will appreciate the variation in conversation. Gather your examples and stories Prepare some notes on your most notable career achievements. Numbers work best, particularly if you’re short on time, so if your department contributed to a 20% increase in revenue, keep that number in mind. Think of your best and most impactful anecdotes, too - an example of a successful negotiation, a challenge where you were the lead problem solver, a project you managed from conception to launch. And don’t forget to let your personality shine through when telling your story as a good company will be looking for a good mix of skills and character.Stay refreshed The demanding nature of the all-day interview means you need to plan ahead and make sure you are equipped with the right items to keep you feeling fresh and help you stay mentally focused until the end. In most cases you will be offered plenty of chances to hydrate throughout the day, bringing a flask of water or coffee is a good idea and will help you to stay alert. Much like a real marathon, these days require stamina, so plan your fuel to keep your brain sharp and keep your energy up between interviews. Choose healthy yet filling snacks like granola bars or fruit, and avoid a sugar rush as the slump will be sure to follow. Also, be careful with caffeine. If you rely on it, regulate your coffee throughout the day to avoid any crashes in the afternoon.Having a mid-day freshen up can work wonders for your energy and focus. Packing sanitary items such as hand/face wipes, deodorant/perfume, and mouthwash may give you the reset you need, particularly after food and coffee, and will help to send you into the second half of the day feeling more awake. In addition, packing a comb or hairbrush will help you to remain presentable, which will make you feel better, too.It may be tempting to sit and scroll on your phone in between interviews, but getting fresh air and going for a walk if you can will help keep you mentally clear. Gentle physical exercise keeps your blood flowing, prevents tiredness and is the best way to keep fatigue at bay. Try to take a proper break without speculation and analysis of how the day is going. Your brain can’t work at full speed all day - try to slow it down and give it a rest before it goes back into full speed at the next interview. Meditation is known as a hugely beneficial practice in instances like these.Approach each interview consistently It is natural that you will exhibit both strengths and weaknesses throughout the day, and it can be difficult to approach the final interviews with the same energy as the first, but it is vital you remain consistent. Keep in mind that even though this is a marathon for you, your meeting with each interviewer is a stand-alone hour or two for them, so try to keep up with pace. Remember to shake the hand of each interviewer, introduce yourself, and be prepared to repeat yourself a few times throughout the day, however tiring it may seem. End each interview on a positive note about how you are excited to interview for the position, reiterate why you believe you are the ideal date, and that you look forward to hearing from them. However, keep in mind that your interviewers will be comparing notes, so avoid telling the same story and highlighting the same achievements during each interview, or you may risk giving the impression that your experience is more limited than it is. During your research process, think of the best information you have which will be relevant for each position. For example, the head of marketing may be engaged with examples where you have shown creativity or solved problems, whereas a sales director will be more interested in figures and percentages. A HR figure will be more interested to hear about your management skills, or a story about dealing with a toxic employee. Again, preparation is key.Stay on your A game Everyone is in the same boat over the course of an all-day interview. Talking for hours in a high-stakes situation can be mentally exhausting, and a mix of anxiety and disinterest can creep in, which is only natural regardless of how passionately you want the job offer. After the initial rush of your first interview you may be facing fatigue, while your intention was to remain positive, confident, and enthusiastic throughout the day. A good way to avoid showing signs of fatigue during later interviews is to be mindful of your body language. Keep in mind that you should be enthusiastic with your gestures; lean forward towards your interviewer and show your passion for what you do through how you move as well as what you say. If you’re tired towards the end of the day, try to avoid speaking flatly and don’t forget to remain sitting up straight, as this will make you both appear and feel alert and passionate about the topic. The majority of all-day interviews will include a break for lunch mid-way through. Not only is this a chance to get a preview of the company canteen and how people interact during their break, it’s also the perfect opportunity to socialize with your possible new co-workers in an informal setting. Though you may need to refresh, you may also view your lunch break as another kind of interview relating to your cultural and personality fit. Your interviewers will be taking note of your social manner, and whether you are easy to communicate with. It is also an opportunity for you to ask questions and discover more about the company in a more casual setting.

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